VIDEO: Management of the Skin in Scleroderma

Lauren Graham, MD, PhD, from the Northwestern Department of Dermatology joined us in October to discuss ways to manage the skin in scleroderma patients. Topics included treatment of telangiectasia using laser lights, full coverage makeup, the scratch itch cycle, Raynaud’s, digital ulcers, and calcinosis.

Laser light treatment causes damage to the vessel and forces it to collapse and scar down so blood can no longer flow through the vessels. This can cause bruising and so Dr. Graham recommended talking to your doctor about which strength is best for you. She also noted that while a normal patient is typically happy with their results after 2 treatments, it could take 3-4 treatments for a patient with scleroderma to be satisfied. Insurance does not generally cover treating telangiectasia with laser lights, but it’s possible for your physician to appeal this decision.

There are multiple brands of makeup that offer full coverage and are recommended by many dermatologists. These include:

  • Cover FX
  • Dermablend
  • Cinema Secrets
  • Microskin (only available in New York and California)
  • MAC

Dr. Graham also discussed the scratch itch cycle and had a few tips to help minimize the effects including:

  • Keep your moisturizer in the fridge
  • Cool water compress
  • Buy fragrance free lotions and not unscented
  • Ointments are the most effective moisturizers
  • Having your doctor mix corticosteroids with Eucerin or CeraVe to lose some of the greasy texture

She specifically recommends Vaseline because it has the least amount of ingredients and is less likely to cause allergies.

For Raynaud’s Dr. Graham pointed out that some medications can make your symptoms worse. She discussed limiting your exposure to cold in places such as the freezer, grocery store, air conditioning, and while holding cold beverages. Another way to do this is by keeping gloves with you, wearing layers, using electric heaters, and not wearing cotton while working out because cotton gets cold when wet. Smoking is another trigger for worsening symptoms with Raynaud’s.

Digital Ulcers are worse when skin is stiff so it is important to keep moisturized. Dr. Graham recommended Bosentan because it can decrease the amount of new ulcers, but has no effect on existing ones. There has also been success with botox and localized digital sympathectomy. Other tips included avoiding infections, making sure your shoes aren’t too tight, and being honest about pain. Remember to visit the ER if your digits are blue/black.

Dr. Graham also talked about how there are 361 trials for Calcinosis, but many are for things other than Scleroderma.

Remember to always talk to your doctor about any possible treatments because they know what’s best for your condition.

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Spotlight: Britney Helm, Support Group Leader, Milwaukee

Recently we interviewed Britney Helm, one of our new support group leaders! She’s excited to be starting a group in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and invites you to get involved. If you are interested in joining this support group or learning more, contact Britney at brit12@gmail.com.

formal pic britney
SF: Why did you decide to start a support group?

BH: When I was diagnosed with Scleroderma, I researched online and found a lot of information. I had no one to help me deal with the emotional and physical part of the disease.  After being a member of another Scleroderma group, I realized that there is a need in the local area to help one another.

SF: When and where will your group meet?

BH: We meet every 3rd Saturday of the Month from 10am-12pm.
Location:  Froedert Hospital – 8700 W Watertown Plank Rd, Wauwatosa, WI 53226

–Community Conference Room 2 located in the Wisconsin Athletic Club building.  Enter building on the 87th Street side look for Community Conference Room entrance.

SF: What are you looking forward to the most in being involved with this group?

BH: The most important part of this group to me is to help others.  This disease is scary and is unknown throughout the community. Nothing is better than to have your fellow Scleroderma members coming together supporting each other.

SF: How do you intend to help or inspire others?

BH: I hope to encourage others that this disease can define a part of who you are, but it can’t take your joy.

SF: Can you tell us a few interesting facts about yourself?

BH:
I love to laugh.

I have hunted alligators in the Panamanian jungle

I love snow, but hate being cold.  I have a lot of gadgets, and a kit that helps keep me warm.

I drive a motorcycle as much as I can, like cars, and getting dirty with tools.

I love to travel.

SF: Do you have any words of advice for other patients and caregivers?

BH:

For patients: Be your own advocate.  Never just take a doctor’s word.  Do your own research and journal your symptoms.

For caregivers: This is tricky because I have seen very supportive people run for the hills.  Caregivers, you will never understand what is going on with Scleroderma patients because the Scleroderma patient doesn’t even know half of the time.  Be patient and understanding.  We are always cold; we are tired but we still want to have fun.  To have fun we have to charge our battery to have a little bit of excitement.  Be patient with us, we are delicate.

 

Britney Helm Group

Britney Helm with her 2015 Germantown, WI  Walk Team